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A hierarchical framework for disentangling different controls on leaf wax δDn-alkane values in terrestrial higher plants

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doi: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2018.10.026
Authors:Liu, Jinzhao; An, Zhisheng
Author Affiliations:Primary:
Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Earth Environment, State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Xi'an, China
Other:
Xi'an Jiaotong University, School of Human Settlements and Civil Engineering, Xi'an, China
Volume Title:Quaternary Science Reviews
Source:Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol.201, p.409-417. Publisher: Elsevier, International. ISSN: 0277-3791
Publication Date:2018
Note:In English
Summary:Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have been widely utilized in terrestrial paleoenvironmental research, and numerous studies have reported that leaf wax δDn-alkane values were affected by a lot of factors. However, the current knowledge regarding the constructive relationships among these factors is still unclear. Based upon a limited compilation of available δDn-alkane records from published literature across the world, we proposed a hierarchical framework of three-level controls on leaf wax δDn-alkane values by using an Interpretive Structural Modeling (ISM). Precipitation δD, plant types and evapotranspiration are the first-level controls that serve as direct co-controls on leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants, on average contributing 47 ± 22%, 20 ± 9.8% and 33%, respectively. The proportions of different controls on leaf wax δDn-alkane values vary significantly over the world, probably responsible for the across-site substantial variability of isotopic fractionation (εapp) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values and precipitation δD. Moreover, extra factors (e.g., salinity, aridity, seasonality etc.) and climate parameters (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, light intensity etc.) execute the second-level and third-level controls on leaf wax δDn-alkane values, respectively. They play indirect controls, through affecting the first-level controls, and thus are translated into leaf wax δDn-alkane values. To quantitatively disentangle these controls on leaf wax δDn-alkane values is important for better understanding the spatial-temporal variability of sedimentary δDn-alkane values.
Record ID:846448-24
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2021 American Geosciences Institute. Reference includes data from CAPCAS, Elsevier Scientific Publishers, Amsterdam, Netherlands
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